Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in nonprofit

Posted on in Fundraising

People are so busy now-a-days! Traveling for their jobs, stuck behind their desks, running out from work to pick up kids from their piano lessons – it’s hard to get a quorum for the classic 2-hour board meeting.

People arrive late, leave early, bail out at the last minute, or their voices float in and out of a disembodied phone speaker so infrequently you barely know they’re there.

Maybe we need to re-think.

Maybe face time should be viewed as a precious commodity, rather than a right – and parceled out when absolutely needed, as opposed to being the default option. 

Last modified on

Posted on in Fundraising

Oversight. Management. Hands-on but not Hands-in.

It's a tough relationship to manage, between board members and the executive director.

And the distinction – that the board oversees the executive director, but board members are not an executive director's “boss” – is a tough one.

How do you establish the trust that gives an executive director the autonomy to run a nonprofit without board member interference, yet assures the board that the executive director is managing the agency well?

And, how can you re-establish trust for a board that's micromanaging the executive director on too tight a leash? 

Last modified on

Posted on in Fundraising

A lot has been written about David Rockefeller’s philanthropic legacy in light of his death last week at the age of 101. From support for local community improvement projects to investing in NYC’s major civic institutions, Mr. Rockefeller’s giving totaled an estimated $2 billion over his lifetime.

David Rockefeller worked hard to transmit what a New York Times article characterized as his family’s philosophy of giving – humility, responsibility, and engagement – through various charitable vehicles. Under this philosophy, we owe a common debt to each other, and much is expected of those who receive.

But while Mr. Rockefeller championed appreciation-fueled giving, his philanthropic interests reveal a deeper motivation than simply giving back. 

Last modified on

Posted on in Fundraising

Working in the nonprofit sector is stressful – and even more so these days.

Providing programs is stressful – both creating and implementing the right programs, and matching the need for services to the money available to fill that need.

Managing finances is stressful – allocating funding across budget lines is never easy, and in times of scarcity it can become even more difficult.

Overseeing people is stressful – particularly when we don’t have the money to reward fine service appropriately.

Fundraising is certainly stressful – especially when the future of innovative programming rests on you.

And finally, looking ahead to maintain that strategic vision, is stressful nowadays – when the environment is throwing zingers our way at any random moment.

The counterweight?

Finding the love. 

Last modified on

Posted on in Fundraising

Nonprofit work is never done. We know that job descriptions read 120% if not 150% – and board members are volunteers with plenty of other pressing concerns on their plates.

Given the never-ending onslaught of tasks, initiatives, responses, emails…why should we spend time repeating an activity that was checked complete a few years back?

The answer lies in that very onslaught. It’s easy to lose sight of why we’re all here – why our cause matters so very much, given the daily cascading of issues in the news.

For those of us whose issues are tangentially connected to the headlines in today’s news – and for those caught right in the heart of the storm – it pays to reaffirm the case for our organizations and our cause.

Last modified on