Fundraising

Posted on in Fundraising

People are so busy now-a-days! Traveling for their jobs, stuck behind their desks, running out from work to pick up kids from their piano lessons – it’s hard to get a quorum for the classic 2-hour board meeting.

People arrive late, leave early, bail out at the last minute, or their voices float in and out of a disembodied phone speaker so infrequently you barely know they’re there.

Maybe we need to re-think.

Maybe face time should be viewed as a precious commodity, rather than a right – and parceled out when absolutely needed, as opposed to being the default option. 

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Posted on in Fundraising

The most critical question in planning a fundraising event?

NOT – what’s the best location…who should we honor…when’s the best date…or even what’s the right format.

All questions that board members – and staff too – love to focus on when starting to think about a special event.

It’s…who will do the asking for us. 

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Posted on in Fundraising

Oversight. Management. Hands-on but not Hands-in.

It's a tough relationship to manage, between board members and the executive director.

And the distinction – that the board oversees the executive director, but board members are not an executive director's “boss” – is a tough one.

How do you establish the trust that gives an executive director the autonomy to run a nonprofit without board member interference, yet assures the board that the executive director is managing the agency well?

And, how can you re-establish trust for a board that's micromanaging the executive director on too tight a leash? 

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Posted on in Fundraising

“If you turn the page, this child will starve…”

Remember that one? Quite dramatic, and for many years held up as the gold standard in fundraising pitches.

Who could resist? The supposition was that it was within your, the reader’s, power to transform a life from one of hunger and misery to one of potential.

But recent research has proven that fundraising pitches accentuating the positive dramatically out-perform messaging based on righting wrongs.

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In a well-run company, leadership development on staff is nurtured, planned, designed.

Why not on boards?

Why do we so often manage board member behavior by default, hoping we have the good fortune of “landing” the next leader through happy accident?

Just like great staff leaders are built through cross-training, shadowing, and education, great board leaders learn by watching the best and by having the chance to spread their wings, little by little, in positions of greater authority and breadth.

By planned growth, in other words. 

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